Anti-Illicit Trade

WHAT’S AT STAKE FOR BUSINESS

Illicit trade is a serious threat that feeds a booming multi-trillion-dollar global illegal economy and harms every market, puts public health and safety at risk, and upends the rule of law and investment climate. It is a threat multiplier that helps fuel transnational crime, corruption, and greater insecurity and instability around the world. Illicit trade results in:

  • Lost revenue and market share;
  • Intellectual property theft, stolen data, and dis-incentivizes innovation;
  • Job displacement for workers and business closures;
  • Increased costs of doing business overseas;
  • Heightened violence and criminality in some markets; and
  • Diminished brand integrity and market reputational value.
USCIB meets with BIAC AITEG delegation to the OECD Working Party on Countering Illicit Trade (WP-CIT) in Paris.
USCIB Staff and Member with Deputy Assistant Sect. of DHS, Office of Policy, Tasha Reid Hippolyte (Left)

CURRENT PRIORITIES

Objectives

  • Illicit Trade in the COVID-19 Crisis Environment. Click here to visit our dedicated page on COVID-19 for messages from our CEO, press releases, member-driven initiatives, and more.
  • Development of Anti-Illicit Trade Committee (AITC) Plan of Action (POA) and focus on key member brand protection concerns and Anti-Illicit Trade (AIT) issues of interest, provided below in alphabetical order:
    • Engagement of China and other Source Markets of Fakes;
    • Targeted Action on Illicit Trade including Counterfeit and Pirated Goods;
    • AIT Enforcement at Free Trade Zones (FTZs);
    • Strengthening Information sharing across sectors and markets; and
    • Address “small parcels” trade in contraband and illicit commodities.
  • Raising public awareness of newly established AITC at USCIB and its commitment to fight illicit trade with U.S. government agencies and U.S. Congress, private sector and business community, international and intergovernmental organizations, and economies and market stakeholders around the world.
  • Active leadership and engagement in Business at OECD and the Business at OECD Anti-Illicit Trade Expert Group (AITEG) and align activities and outcomes.

USCIB AT WORK:

  • At OECD, engage via Business at OECD, on the work of the Task Force on Countering Illicit Trade (TF-CIT) in efforts to address the threats and barriers tied to illicit trade, promoting strategic alliances, and work closely with BIAC and OECD on webinars on illicit trade in the COVID crisis environment.
  • Bridging Partnerships: In APEC, explore possible synergies with OECD and Business at OECD; OECD-APEC collaborations in 2019-2020; and G2B opportunities on fighting illicit trade across markets.
  • At ICC, where relevant, engage in the work of the Business Action to Stop Counterfeiting and Piracy (BASCAP) initiative.
  • In Washington, where we regularly meet with U.S. government officials to educate them on the work of the AITC particularly with the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Treasury, White House (National Security Council and Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator), and U.S. National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center.

 

FEATURED DOCUMENTS:

WHO WE ARE

The USCIB Anti-Illicit Trade Committee is composed of USCIB member companies representing a range of business and industry sectors. Priorities are determined that reflect a consensus among the members.

The Committee takes a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary, approach and public-private partnerships, to elevate the fight against illicit trade, particularly related to the work of the OECD’s TF-CIT, corresponding activity by Business at OECD, and the work of the International Chamber of Commerce’s Business Action to Stop Counterfeiting and Piracy (BASCAP) initiative.

Mission

The Committee promotes strong international AIT leadership and advocates for a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary approach to the complex topic of illicit trade including, among others:

  • Business at OECD and Business at OECD Anti-Illicit Trade Expert Group (AITEG)
  • OECD Task Force on Countering Illicit Trade (TFCIT), Governance Directorate
  • APEC and in other strategic international fora in advance of USCIB Partnerships
  • U.S. Departments of Commerce, Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Treasury, White House (National Security Council and Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator), and U.S. National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

All USCIB members are eligible to participate in the USCIB Anti-Illicit Trade Committee. If you are a member and would like to be added to this committee or if you would like more information on how to become a member, please contact:

Alison Hoiem
Senior Director, Member Services
(202) 682-1291 – ahoiem@uscib.org

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

David Luna
President and CEO
Luna Global Networks & Convergence Strategies LLC

Staff

Megan Giblin
Director, Customs & Trade Facilitation
(202) 371-9235 – mgiblin@uscib.org

Staff

Ashley Harrington
Policy & Program Assistant, Washington
202-683-5861 or aharrington@uscib.org

 

Customs and Trade Facilitation

Trends and Challenges in Customs:

  • Unnecessary and burdensome barriers to trade can cost companies and national economies billions of dollars.
  • Global convergence and modernization of customs practices are necessary for efficient supply chains.
  • Trade facilitation and robust implementation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) are critical to members of the trade. The TFA promises to streamline customs processes and procedures, provide increased transparency, predictability, and speed the movement of goods across borders around the world.

 

USCIB Meets With WCO Secretary-General Elect Ian Saunders (2023)

USCIB is committed to pursuing a broad trade and customs agenda in 2023. The USCIB Customs and Trade Facilitation Committee (CTFC) promotes elimination of trade barriers and harmonization of global customs and border procedures and focuses on supporting the expedited cost-effective movement of goods across borders in full compliance with import requirements.

USCIB Staff and Members at the 2024 Trade Facilitation and Cargo Security Summit in Philadelphia

Current Priorities:

(alphabetical)

  • Classification, valuation, origin: at the domestic and international level (WTO and WCO, as applicable) ensuring industry engagement and issue resolution
  • CTPAT/Trusted Trader, Minimum Security Criteria (MSC), Mutual Recognition, and WCO Safe Framework
  • Customs and TF Provisions of U.S. Free Trade Agreements, securing a better outcome for customs and TF provisions as well as ensuring compliance
  • Customs Modernization, guidance and direction on 21st Century Customs environment
  • Digitalization including a focus on Customs Data – Confidential Business Information, Data Protection, Data Sharing and Interoperability of Single Windows, protecting CBI and ensuring necessary protections are in place
  • E-Commerce in the Customs space, focused on the cross-border movement of physical goods acquired via any online means (e.g., WCO E-Commerce FoS)
  • Expedited and full implementation of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement
  • Forced labor: (Section 307, UFLPA, etc.), guidance and direction
  • Green Customs, providing a thoughtful prioritization in the customs space

USCIB’s Response:

  • Provide thoughtful and focused U.S. domestic and international recommendations on Customs and Trade Facilitation matters including, but not limited to, customs modernization, forced labor, digitalization and confidential business information (CBI) protections,  customs classification, and customs valuation. Represent ICC as authorized representatives to the  WCO Harmonized System Committee (HSC) and Review Subcommittee (RSC) meetings.
  • Advocate for our members in efforts to secure the global classification of products at WCO.
  • Advocate for full (robust) and expedited l implementation of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA).
  • Work in collaboration with U.S. agencies on customs and TF matters before the WTO, including (USG) on humanitarian cargo /shipments at the WTO Committee on TF, and matters before the Committee on Customs Valuation.
  • Advance thoughtful consensus, member-supported, comments which often take into consideration potential implementation issues and/or unintended consequences on such key issues as Customs matters in the crisis environments (e.g., COVID, natural disasters, etc) , Customs and Trade Facilitation provisions in FTAs, forced labor, domestic and international e-commerce efforts in the customs space related to physical goods movement (e.g., WCO Framework of Standards).
  • Advocate for business on issues such as customs modernization,  customs classification and valuation, forced labor, green customs, non-application of customs formalities to electronic transmissions, and more. Leverage participation in government advisory groups (e.g., ITAC13– Customs and Trade Facilitation, COAC 21 CCF Task Force) to raise member issues of interest and member consensus inputs on Committee priority topics.
  • Meet with U.S. government officials at the key agencies of  Department of Commerce, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, Department of Treasury, and Department of State to ensure that U.S. business interests are well reflected in U.S. government positions.
  • Promote the reduction of trade barriers and transaction costs at the border, as well as in customs control practices and advocates for the harmonization of global customs procedures by leveraging various fora and government agencies

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business
  • Build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

Michelle Welsh
Senior Counsel
Global Trade Compliance Legal
Google, Inc.

Staff

Megan Giblin
Director
Customs & Trade Facilitation
202-371-9235 or mgiblin@uscib.org

Staff

Ashley Harrington
Policy & Program Assistant, Washington
202-682-5861 or aharrington@uscib.org

 

China

Trends and Challenges Facing Companies in China:

  • The United States is the largest investor in China, and China is the United States’ third largest trading partner, with one of the largest economies in the world.
  • Despite being an important trading partner, trade-restrictive requirements persist for USCIB members doing business in China, including forced technology transfers, foreign investment restrictions, severe digital and cloud market access prohibitions, inadequate intellectual property protection, significantly disadvantaging and weakening the global competitiveness of U.S. companies.

USCIB’s Response:

  • Support resumption of bilateral dialogue and cooperation with China in order to stabilize relations, discuss disputes and effectively manage this extensive economic relationship that has been in downward spiral for several years.
  • Advance U.S. business concerns regarding China’s implementation of its WTO obligations and compliance with the “Phase One” U.S.-China Economic and Trade Agreement, specifically with USTR and the U.S. government interagency Trade Policy Staff Committee.
  • Promote Administration coordination with allies at the OECD, WTO, G20, G7 and other global forums on a collective approach to addressing security and supply chain concerns, distortive trade practices and securing a level playing field with China.
  • Oppose tariff wars and efforts to repeal Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR) with China without meaningful consultation with industry and serious consideration of the economic harm it would cause.
  • Press for stronger, earlier and broader business engagement to ensure policies linked with economic security, such as investment screenings, are narrowly targeted and transparently implemented.
  • Monitor legislative and regulatory developments in the National People’s Congress and the central government in China

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business.
  • We engage with our sister business organizations in China—the China Chamber of International Commerce (ICC China) and the China Enterprise Confederation (IOE China)—to address top issues facing U.S. companies engaged in trade and investment with China.
  • We build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

Vacant

Staff

Alice Slayton Clark
Senior Vice President for Trade, Investment, and Digital Policy
asclark@uscib.org

Staff

Ashley Harrington
Policy & Program Assistant, Washington
aharrington@uscib.org

 

 

Competition

Trends and Challenges Facing U.S. Business:

  • As antitrust enforcement continues to be aggressive, USCIB promotes sound competition enforcement and procedures domestically and globally.
  • The U.S. government looks to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and the Development (OECD) and the International Competition Network (ICN) to foster international convergence and cooperation on competition law, including merger reviews and antitrust enforcement.
  • U.S. companies need a unified voice to serve in both the OECD and ICN on competition law, international engagement, trade-related competition issues and mergers.

 

 

 

USCIB’s Response:

  • Through Business at OECD, Serve as a strong voice for business at both the OECD and the ICN on international convergence and cooperation discussions.
  • Promote international legal policies that favor an open and competitive environment for U.S. business.
  • Monitor global competition developments and contribute industry’s perspective through USCIB’s network.
  • Advise U.S. government officials, including the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission, on business positions concerning international antitrust issues and secure support for those positions in international forums

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business
  • We build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

Dina Kallay
Head of Antitrust (IPR, Americas & Asia-Pacific)
Ericsson

Vice Chair

Jesus Alvarado-Rivera
Global Director, Antitrust
AB-InBev

Jennifer Patterson
Partner
Haug Partners LLP

Staff

Alice Slayton Clark
Senior Vice President for Trade, Investment, and Digital Policy
asclark@uscib.org

Ashley Harrington
Policy and Program Assistant, Washington
aharrington@uscib.org

 

Trade and Investment

Trends and Challenges Facing U.S. Business:

  • Open markets for trade and investment have contributed to macroeconomic stability, global prosperity and job growth in the United States and around the world. This truth is being eclipsed today by protectionist pressures and policies built on the false premise that market liberalization must be paused in order to advance social and environmental goals.
  • The U.S. must reclaim its leadership role in engaging partners on a clean and just economy while opening markets and leveling the playing field for U.S. goods, services, agriculture, digital, and investment.

USCIB’s Response:

  • Press for the resumption of U.S. leadership, including in global fora like the OECD and WTO, to advance U.S. business interests and confront discriminatory action against U.S. goods and services, unfair foreign trade practices, and denial of market access. Read about USCIB’s Advocacy Campaign on the OECD accession process.
  • Advocate for more trade and regional diversification to help businesses cushion shocks and sustain domestic operations while expanding economic opportunity for allies to join global production networks.
  • Caution against calls to onshore or localize production and urge close collaboration with industry to develop policies that minimize unintentional economic harm while advancing national or economic security interests.
  • Promote U.S. resolve in enforcing obligations under trade agreements like USMCA and in upholding commitments under WTO agreements, including the Agreements on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) and Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT).
  • Urge the return to long held U.S. positions in support of strong digital trade rules and progress on advancing 21st century standards for the full range of services trade.
  • Discourage counterproductive measures that undercut our international commitments or could lead to retaliatory measures that hurt U.S. companies and workers.
  • Maximize foreign direct investment and defend the provisions of international investment agreements that safeguard U.S. foreign investments and help investors obtain fair treatment without compromising legitimate regulation.
  • Encourage a truly inclusive consultation process that considers business views equally among stakeholders, to advance on-the-ground, pragmatic and innovative practices that safeguard our national economic interests.

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business
  • We build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

Charles R. (Rick) Johnston
Managing Director, Global Government Affairs
Citigroup Inc.

Staff

Alice Slayton Clark
Senior Vice President for Trade, Investment, and Digital Policy
asclark@uscib.org

Ashley Harrington
Policy and Program Assistant, Washington
aharrington@uscib.org

 

 

International Product Policy

Trends and Challenges Facing Upstream and Downstream Users of Chemicals:

  • Unbalanced requirements that can undermine market access and related industry initiatives
  • The UN Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM) will be focusing on the sound management of chemicals and waste beyond 2020
  • New chemicals regulations that are inconsistent with existing guidelines and are therefore unnecessarily burdensome to companies
USCIB Staff and Members Attending INC-2 at the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, France.

USCIB’s Response:

  • Advocate for product and chemicals policies in forums such as the UN and the OECD that reflect good science, protect confidential business information, and avoid technical barriers to trade to ensure that U.S. products have timely access to markets around the world
  • Ensure industry views are well represented at SAICM to press for risk-based assessments of chemicals
  • Serve as the lead voice for U.S. business in forums such as APEC pushing for regulatory coherence between differing chemicals management regimes

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business
  • Build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

Sophia Danenberg
Manager, Environmental Health and Safety
Regulatory Program
The Boeing Company

Staff

Christopher Olsen
Policy Manager, Regulation and Trade
202-617-3156 or colsen@uscib.org

Ashley Harrington
Policy and Program Assistant
202-682-5861 or aharrington@uscib.org

 

Food and Agriculture

Trends and Challenges Facing the Food & Agriculture sector:

  • Responding to rapidly evolving changes in global food systems due to dramatic shifts in climate and demand.
  • The shift away from evidence -based policy responses to meaningful food security and enhanced environmental sustainability.
  • The growing trend to view business as the “problem” and not part of the solution among public and private actors who fail to recognize mutual interests and limitations.

 

 

USCIB’s Response:

  • Advocating for business as a solutions partner in international forums including the OECD Health Committee and OECD Agriculture committee.
  • Showcasing business leadership, investments and innovation at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) as they seek effective policy approaches on food security and nutrition in the context of changing rural-urban dynamics.
  • Calling for public/private partnerships involving all stakeholders to improve transparency and broaden participation to meet the global challenges facing the sustainability of agriculture and food systems.

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business.
  • Build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

Randy Giroux
Vice President, Global Regulatory Leader
Cargill

Staff

Norine Kennedy
Senior Vice President, Policy and Global Strategy
212-703-5052 or nkennedy@uscib.org

Ashley Harrington
Policy and Program Assistant
202-682-5861 or aharrington@uscib.org

 

Health Care

Trends and Challenges Facing the Health Care Sector:

  • Global health issues have risen to the top of the agenda as policymakers struggle to ensure the best quality health care at an affordable price
  • The digital transformation of health care systems provides fresh opportunities for better care, newer treatments, and greater focus on the needs of the patient
  • Non-communicable diseases harm the growth and productivity of the economy and the well-being of societies

USCIB’s Response:

  • Advocate for multi-stakeholder initiatives and the central role of science- and evidence-based data in developing policy
  • Press for policies at the OECD that create the right incentives and collaborative environments to drive investment in innovation and technology
  • Advance voluntary consumer initiatives, responsible marketing, and healthy lifestyles

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business
  • Build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Staff

Ashley Harrington
Policy and Program Assistant
202-682-5861 or aharrington@uscib.org

 

Digital Policy

Trends and Challenges Facing the ICT Sector:

  • The digital transformation of the economy affecting areas from trade to tax to labor as well as emerging technologies such as AI, IoT and Blockchain
  • The efforts of some UN Security Council members to bring governance of the Internet, management of the domain names system and cybersecurity norms and regulations under the purview of the UN and other intergovernmental forums
  • Privacy regulations that prove overly burdensome to business operations or hamper innovation

USCIB’s Response:

Magnifying Your Voice with USCIB:

  • USCIB is the only U.S. business association formally affiliated with the world’s three largest business organizations where we work with business leaders across the globe to extend our reach to influence policymakers in key international markets to American business
  • Build consensus with like-minded industry peers and participate in off-the-record briefings with policymakers both home and abroad.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

JoAnn Stonier
Mastercard Fellow of Data and AI
Mastercard

Digital Governance Working Group

Helen Harris
Senior Manager, Public Policy
Amazon

UN Internet Governance Working Group

Flavia Alves
Head of International Institutions & Relations
Meta

Amy Alvarez
Assistant Vice President, International External & Regulatory Affairs
AT&T

AI Governance Working Group

Ben Wallis
Director, Technology Policy, UN Affairs & International Organizations
Microsoft

Elaine Newton
Principal, AI Standards and Tech Policy
Amazon

Staff

Cheryl Miller
Vice President, Digital Policy
202-617-3155 or cmiller@uscib.org

Nan Schechter
Program and Policy Associate, Digital Issues
202-682-7465 or nschechter@uscib.org

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Working Group

USCIB supports the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals. As the only U.S. business group with UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) NGO observer status, USCIB brings the voice of U.S. business to key UN deliberations pertaining to sustainability, working closely with its global sister business organizations, the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) and the International Organization of Employers (IOE).

The SDG Working Group informs UN policy deliberations, and facilitates ongoing dialogue with UN officials, U.S. representatives to the UN, as well as other governmental representatives, business organizations and key stakeholders. In addition, it provides a platform for USCIB members to showcase their actions and initiatives to deliver the SDGs, through side events, webinars and active participation at key UN meetings and deliberations at the UN in New York and elsewhere around the globe.

Objectives:

USCIB’s SDG Working Group invites member participation from all sustainability related USCIB Policy Committees, including the Environment Committee and the Corporate Responsibility and Labor Affairs Committee.

The SDG Working Group:

  • Advocates balanced economic, environmental and social policy frameworks to deliver the SDGs, mobilizing public private partnerships, and enhancing meaningful and substantive engagement of the private sector.
  • Calls for inclusive multilateralism that provides transparent and meaningful opportunities for all sectors of business to contribute to scientific assessment, inform policy deliberations, and track, measure and improve implementation.
  • Monitors and weighs in on business relevant UN deliberations under the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with a focus on where business helps advance the SDGs.
  • Provides U.S. business views and involvement in relevant UN meetings, such as UN ECOSOC Partnership Forum, Science, Technology and Innovation Forum and Financing for Development meetings, leading up to the annual UN High Level Political Forum and the opening weeks of the UN General Assembly.
  • Highlights U.S. business initiatives to integrate and deliver the SDGs, through official side events, high-level business dialogues, and other events.

Priorities for 2021 – 2022

The primary focus of UN discussions will continue to be on pandemic response and recovery, as the entire organization turns its attention to tackling thus multi-dimensional crisis, and develops proposals for integrated actions to “build back better.” Increasingly, UN institutions.
Other major developments in 2021 – 2022 include UN wide efforts to accelerate implementation of the SDGs and get back on track to meet 2030 targets, and follow-up from the UN General Assembly UN75 Global Dialogue, setting into motion consideration of options to make the UN more meaningful and responsive to current and future challenges.

USCIB’s SDG Group will continue to:

  • Express business views in favor of good governance and rule of law, enabling frameworks for private sector infrastructure investment and innovation, and the importance of rigorous metrics and indicators to track progress in SDG implementation.
  • Draw attention to the role of the private sector in converging pandemic recovery and sustainability action, and shine a spotlight on public private partnerships with and through the UN system.
  • Inform the review of both the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and the HLPF, with a view to strengthening their effectiveness in advancing the 2030 Global Goals.
  • Work with USCIB All In UN75 initiative and other business partners to make the case for inclusive multilateralism and public private sector partnerships with and through the United Nations.
  • Maintain close cooperation with U.S. Missions to the UN in New York and Geneva to advance enabling frameworks for private sector solutions and engagement across the 17 SDGs.
  • Continue to support of the Business and Industry Major Group as a recognized constituency in the United Nations in New York, for which USCIB serves as a co-chair.

Background

Launched in 2015, the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals represented a global consensus blueprint, setting out 17 goals and 169 targets for sustainability by 2030. The SDGs were developed in an inclusive series of meetings that sought and included input from non-governmental interests, and USCIB was able to observe and feed in its members’ views in the process – especially in including economic, job creation, partnership and good governance as integral elements of the SDGs and UN 2030 Agenda. USCIB has also represented its members in every meeting of the UN High Level Political Forum, the specific UN body that reviews national actions and seeks to strengthen implementation of the SDGs.

USCIB on LinkedIn

Chair

Dr. Alejandra Castro
Global Head, Partnerships – International Organizations, Bayer

Staff

Ewa Staworzynska
Director, Corporate Responsibility and Labor Affairs
212-703-5056 or at ewa@uscib.org

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Agnes Vinblad
Director, Environment and Sustainable Development
212-703-5082 or avinblad@uscib.org