Register and Apply

 

Appointed by the U.S. Treasury Department and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in 1969, U.S. Council for International Business (USCIB) is the national guaranteeing and issuing organization of ATA Carnets in the United States. USCIB has appointed two independent Carnet Service Providers to issue ATA and TECRO/AIT Carnets. Please click on a logo below to simply Register and Apply from one of our service providers.

Processing Fees

Fee Types

Fees

General List Value Range

$1 - $9,999$255
$10,000 - $49,999$300
$50,000 - $149,999$365
$150,000 - $399,999$425
$400,000 - $999,999$480
Over $1,000,000$545

Continuation Sheets (GL)

$12 per additional page

Additional Sets

$25 per set
Post Issue of Original Carnet$80, minimum

Replacement Carnet

Replacement - Application$275
Replacement - Activation$175

Expedited Options: Expedited and same-day delivery may be available. Check with your issuing office for costs and availability. Additional charges may apply.

Delivery Options: Check with your issuing office for availability. Courier charges apply.

Security Deposits

All Carnets require a security deposit equal to 40% of the value of the General List. For India, the security deposit will be equal to 55% of the value of the General List.

Road vehicles covered by a Carnet require 100% security for corporations or 150% if the Holder is an individual, and all vehicles visiting China require a minimum of 100% security deposit.

CASH

Certified checks and money orders are made payable to your Carnet issuing Service Provider, boomerang carnets or Roanoke Trade (minimum $100).

SURETY BOND

Surety bonds may be obtained through our Service providers who are carnet bond specialists or from any of the 200 companies authorized by the U.S. Treasury Department, admitted in New York State, and have an A.M. Best rating of A- or better. Bond premiums are typically 1% of the bond amount (a minimum premium may apply).

REFUNDABLE CLAIM DEPOSIT (RCD)

In lieu of a cash deposit or bond, federal government agencies may remit a Refundable Claim Deposit (RCD) of $250 per Carnet. Agencies must also complete the Application for Waiver of Security.  Effective January 1, 2010, non-Federal Government Agencies are required to post a standard security deposit in the form of cash or a surety bond as explained above.

WRITTEN AGREEMENT

As of January 1, 2010 Written Agreement in lieu of a cash or a bond and is only available to select members. For further details please contact your service provider.

Cash deposits and RCDs are returned in full. Surety bonds are terminated once the original Carnets have been returned for cancellation and no claims are anticipated by Carnet HQ. While Carnets are good for up to one year, if a claim arises, it may be necessary to hold the security deposit until the claim is resolved.

Power of Attorney

If a customs broker, freight forwarder or agent is preparing the application on behalf of a Carnet holder, a Power of Attorney must accompany this application.  Please contact your service provider for a Power of Attorney form.

How to Use a Carnet

Review our overview on how to use a Carnet at every step of your trip.

USCIB Policy

Jewelry

It is highly recommended that identifying photographs be appended to the General List for Carnets entering European Union, especially Italy and the United Kingdom. It is also recommended that identifying photographs be appended to the General List for all types of Jewelry entries into Israel.

Holders should have blue transit certificates in their Carnet when bringing jewelry samples and/or loose precious stones to France and Switzerland for exhibitions or fairs.

Motor Vehicles

Motor vehicles may travel on ATA Carnets only if the vehicles are commercial samples, professional equipment (e.g. for races) or to be displayed at an exhibition or fair. Special security deposit rules apply. Vehicles crossing the US Canada border as means of transportation are exempt from ATA Carnet requirements.

Personal use road vehicles (autos, motorcycles, trailers, ATVs, RVs, caravans) for touring, vacation and non-business travel need to obtain a CPD (Carnet de Passages en Douanes). To obtain a CPD, contact Monika Jadeszko at +1 847.852.3100 or Info@CPDCarnet.comboomerang carnets for assistance. Boomerang carnets is authorized by the FIA to issue CPDs to American and Canadian residents for touring purposes.

Horses

Effective April 1, 2017 all ATA Carnet Preparers that have a horse listed on their general list will be required to complete and submit an ATA Carnet Horse Questionnaire (click to download form) along with any related supporting documentation before the ATA Carnet can be issued. USCIB recommends Preparers use the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) database https://data.fei.org/Default.aspx as a tool to assist validation of the value of the horses in addition to the questionnaire. USCIB no longer requires that the minimum value of horse listed on the general list of the ATA Carnet be $10,000. The actual value of the horse must be listed on the general list of the Carnet.

Government Agency Requirements

Export/Import Requirements

Obtaining a Carnet does not release your obligation to comply with U.S. Government export controls or foreign country import controls.  Some articles may require an export license for reasons of national security and foreign policy.  An export license allows U.S. companies to export commodities that are controlled by U.S. regulations.  Check with foreign customs in advance for their restriction or requirements on goods entering their country.

Electronic Export Information Filing

Effective May 15, 2015 and as a result of changes to the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR), ATA Carnet is exempt from filng. These changes cover both U.S. and foreign ATA Carnets, as well as those coming from and going to Chinese Taipei (TECRO/AIT). For a complete guide to the new FTR export requirements click here.

10+2 Importer Security Filing

ATA Carnets are not exempt from importer security filing (ISF, otherwise known as 10+2). However, ATA Carnet shipments ARE exempt from posting the bond required of other shipments entering or re-entering the U.S. via vessel. Except for the provision of the six digit HTSUS codes, the information needed to complete the ISF can be found on the Carnet or available from the broker clearing the entry.

Additional Considerations

Air Couriers

While DHL accepts Carnet shipments, FedEx and UPS (small package divisions) generally do not.

Commercial Value

Using the insured value of goods on your General List will usually result in a “reasonable commercial value”.

Validating a Carnet in the U.S.

Please refer to our list of U.S. Airports for Validating a Carnet and the CBP Ports page to see where you can validate a Carnet in the U.S.

To avoid a claim, have the counterfoils and vouchers validated upon entry and exit into a foreign country.  Make doubly sure that the yellow Re-importation Counterfoil is stamped by US customs.  This is your last line of defense to settle a claim.

For Carnets with a valid claim, Holders are subject to duties and taxes and fees levied by a foreign customs authority. Holders will also be charged a USCIB Claims Handling Fee.

Carnet Shipments Held-Up at Customs

During regular business hours, contact USCIB, Carnet HQ, immediately for assistance; tel: 800-538-8937, fax: (212) 944-0012, email: atacarnet@uscib.org.

Carnet Green Cover

Upon initial departure, the Holder or authorized representative must sign the green cover. U.S. Customs must validate the green cover and a yellow exportation counterfoil to activate the Carnet for its first use.  Foreign customs may deny entry of goods under a Carnet if neither the green cover nor the exportation counterfoil is properly validated.

Restricted Carnets

A foreign customs authority has the right to restrict the duration of a Carnet shipment and require that the goods leave prior to the expiration date of the Carnet.  If a customs authority limits your stay, this will be noted on the importation counterfoil (Item 2—Final Date of Re-Exportation) at the time of entry. Some countries will only accept importation under Carnet for 6 months, without making a notation.

Substituting Goods or Goods for Repair

Goods may not be substituted or replaced once they are accepted and printed on the carnet General List.  Carnets do not cover goods intended for processing or repairs.

Questions?

Call 1.800.538.8937

Email atacarnet@uscib.org

ATA Carnet FAQs

Here are some of the most commonly asked questions about Carnets. You can also jump to a specific section using the links below:

 

Obtaining and Using a U.S. Carnet:

  1. What options do I have if I am taking goods out of the country and planning to return them?
  2. Why must a security deposit be provided?
  3. How specific do the descriptions need to be on the General List?
  4. Some items on my Carnet will travel to country A and others to country B a week later. Do I need multiple Carnets?
  5. Who in my company should sign section “F. obligation” on the application and the General List?
  6. How to use ATA Carnet in EU Countries?
  7. Are there specific regulations for goods entering India?
  8. Are there specific regulations for goods entering China?
  9. Do I still need an export License when using a carnet?
  10. I need to move goods out of the U.S. , but do not have a legal residence or Taxpayer ID in the U.S. Is it possible to obtain a U.S. Carnet?
  11. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?

Avoiding a Claim on a U.S. Carnet – Cancellation and Claims

  1. When do I return the Carnet?
  2. To where do I return the Carnet?
  3. My Carnet is still valid, but I have used all the counterfoils and vouchers. What should I do?
  4. We have lost our Carnet. What shall we do?
  5. I received a duplicate Carnet after I lost the original. The duplicate was sent back to you so why do I still receive reminder letters?
  6. Can I sell the goods under Carnet?
  7. I have a U.S. Carnet, but the goods will not leave before it expires. What do I do?
  8. My Carnet was never used. Do I still return it?
  9. Are there restrictions on Items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?

Using a Foreign Carnet in the U.S.

  1. What if I don’t get my carnet stamped leaving the country?
  2. My goods need to stay in the U.S. beyond Carnet expiration. What are my options?
  3. May I use a foreign Carnet to enter Puerto Rico, Guam or the U.S. Virgin Islands?
  4. I would like to sell my goods imported into the U.S. on foreign-issued Carnet. How should I proceed?
  5. Are there restrictions on items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?
  6. Can I bring a vehicle into the U.S. under a foreign-issued Carnet?
  7. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?
  8. Can I use a Carnet for an Exhibit at a Trade Show in the U.S.?

General Information:

  1. What do the acronyms ATA and TECRO/AIT represent?
  2. What is the Origin of the ATA Carnet System?
  3. How do I learn about the Carnets around the world?
  4. How does the new Electronic Export Information filing requirement impact your ATA Carnet?
  5. Where can I validate a Carnet in the U.S.?


Obtaining and Using a U.S. Carnet

  1. What options do I have if I am taking goods out of the country and planning to return them?
    All countries have procedures allowing for the temporary importation of goods for across their borders. Such importations are generally valid for less than 12 months Importers may choose from three options when considering a temporary importation: (1) Duty refund, (2) Temporary importation under bond (TIB), and (3) Carnet.

    • Duty refund is the process by which an importer registers the goods at the time of entry, and deposits the applicable duties and taxes. In Europe, duty and taxes range from 20-30%, Australia 10%, China 40%, of the value of the goods. (Check VAT chart for details.) At the time of departure, the exporter presents the goods and appropriate paperwork to a customs inspector. Exporters can expect to receive a full refund of the duties and taxes posted at some future point. (For Europe, refunds are generally made 2-6 months after departure. Payments are made in local currency, e.g., South African Rand.)
    • To use a TIB, importers are required to secure the TIB from a customhouse broker at the time of entry into the foreign country. The purchase of a TIB is required for each country visited on every trip. Fees for TIBs vary widely.
    • Carnets: May be used for unlimited exits from and entries into the U.S. and foreign countries; are accepted in over 85 countries and territories worldwide; eliminate value-added taxes (VAT), duties, and the posting of security normally required at the time of importation; and simplify customs procedures. Carnets allow temporary exporters to use a single document for all customs transactions, make arrangements in advance, and at a predetermined cost. Carnets facilitate reentry into the U.S. by eliminating the need to register goods with U.S. Customs at the time of departure.

  2. Why must a security deposit be provided?
    The ATA Carnet conventions require it. Equally important, security deposits provide financial stability to the ATA system. There is one designated Guaranteeing Association in each country where Carnets are accepted. The role of the Guaranteeing Association is to guarantee the payment of duties and taxes to customs authorities (both domestic and foreign) that present valid claims. In the case of the U.S., the USCIB must pay all valid claims (resulting from Carnets originating in the U.S.) to foreign authorities and to U.S. Customs on all foreign Carnets.
  3. How specific do the descriptions need to be on the General List?
    The more specific the better, as customs has the right to stop goods from entering its border for lack of adequate description. Include serial numbers or model numbers whenever possible. An imprecise or incomplete description may cause a customs inspector to question the importation (or re-exportation) and possibly seize the goods.
  4. Some items on my Carnet will travel to country A and others to country B a week later. Do I need multiple Carnets?
    Not necessarily, split shipments are possible. Depending on amount of time between the two shipments a second Carnet may be advised. Contact your Carnet Service Provider for details.
  5. Who in my company should sign section “F. Obligation” on the application and the General List?
    It would have to be someone who possesses the authority to obligate the company to payment of duties and taxes should they come due.
  6. How to use ATA Carnet in EU countries?
    The twenty seven members of the European Union (EU) are one customs union and are noted as such on the green cover of your carnet. Customs documentation is not required when traveling between/among EU states. Assuming carnet goods are traveling by vehicle from the UK through France and Spain and departing from the EU from Portela airport in Lisbon, the goods will only be subject to two customs clearances, one in England and one in Portugal. The carnet importation counterfoil and voucher should be validated upon arrival at Heathrow airport in the England and then again at departure in Portugal where the re-exportation sheets should be stamped.Please keep in mind that Switzerland and Norway are not members of the EU and thus customs clearance would be required for either/both.
  7. Are there specific regulations for goods entering India?
    India will only accept goods under Carnet if the intended use is for exhibitions and fairs, and generally allows the goods to remain in India for six months.
  8. Are there specific regulations for goods entering China?
    China will only accept goods under Carnet if the intended use is for exhibitions and fairs, and generally allows the goods to remain in China for six months.
  9. Do I still need an export license when using a Carnet?
    Yes, please click here for more details.
  10. I need to move goods out of the U.S. , but do not have a legal residence in the U.S. Is it possible to obtain a U.S. Carnet?
    In most Instances, it is not possible to obtain a U.S. Carnet without a legal residence and Taxpayer ID. To discuss your specific circumstances contact Glendy Sung at 212.703.5073 or gsung@uscib.org.
  11. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?
    Present your Carnet and goods to U.S. Customs before checking in your baggage and boarding your flight, even if it connects at another U.S. city. U.S. Customs and Border Protection has recently ruled that Carnets should be stamped out of the U.S. (export or re-export) where the Carnet holder last had control of the goods and is not able to come into contact with them until they have arrived at the final foreign destination.For example, a U.S. company is going to show some samples listed on an ATA Carnet to a potential customer in the U.K. The Carnet holder has a flight from Dallas to New York, connecting to a New York-Heathrow flight. He would present his goods and Carnet at U.S. Customs at Dallas for export validation before checking in his luggage with the air carrier through to London.The policy decision by U.S. Customs is based on CBP Directive 3280-013B and Muster Topic (#CCS-FY12-0031) dated 10/17/2011 in conjunction with the Office of Field Operations.

Avoiding a Claim on a U. S. Carnet – Cancellation and Claims

  1. When do I return the Carnet?
    The Carnet should be returned after its final use or immediately after its expiration whichever comes first.
  2. To where do I return the Carnet?
    The Carnet holder should make and keep a clear copy of the whole Carnet booklet (all used and even un-used sheets), and return the original via receipted mail to the company that issued you the Carnet.
  3. My Carnet is still valid, but I have used all the counterfoils and vouchers. What should I do?
    If you need to make additional trips with your Carnet, you may apply for additional sets of counterfoils and vouchers by simply contacting the company that issued the Carnet for assistance in obtaining additional sets. The cost is $20 per set (minimum charge is $75.) plus shipping and handling. This fee includes up to four sets of yellow, white or blue counterfoils and their corresponding vouchers.
  4. We have lost our Carnet. What shall we do?
    Call the office that issued your Carnet. If you wish, a duplicate will be issued. Additional fees will apply.
  5. I received a duplicate Carnet after I lost the original. The duplicate was sent back to you, so why do I still receive reminder letters?
    In order to cancel a Carnet, both the duplicate and the original must be returned. Carnets not returned will be considered “open”. Security deposits on “open” Carnets will not be returned or cancelled until 13 months after Carnet expiration, and reminder letters are generated on any Carnet not returned.
  6. Can I sell the goods covered under Carnet?
    Carnets should be used for goods NOT intended for sale. However, it is possible to sell off a Carnet. In addition to the payment of duties and taxes, goods sold off Carnet are subject to a penalty equal to 10% of the amount of the duties and taxes. A USCIB Claims Handling Fee may also apply. For goods sold off Carnet, it is recommended that you contact a local customs office to determine the procedure best suited to your circumstance. Some countries, e.g., U.K. and Australia tightly control the sale of goods off Carnet. Generally, local customs will request that the goods and Carnet be brought to the local office prior to Carnet expiration so that the Carnet may be properly discharged and duties, taxes, and penalty paid. BE SURE TO OBTAIN AN ITEMIZED CUSTOMS RECEIPT noting the: items sold, amount paid, and Carnet number. Send the original Carnet and a copy of the Customs receipt to the company that issued your Carnet. Be sure to retain a clear copy of the Carnet for your records.
  7. I have a U.S. Carnet, but the goods will not leave before it expires. What do I do?
    For goods that must remain in the foreign country beyond the Carnet expiration date, it may be possible to obtain a “replacement Carnet.” A replacement Carnet has a new Carnet number but contains the same General List as the original Carnet. The Replacement is typically good for one year. The Replacement and original Carnet are presented to foreign customs at which time the original is ‘closed’ and the Replacement is ‘opened’ thus allowing the goods to remain past the date of expiration on the original document. For details, contact the office that issued your Carnet at least 30 days before expiration.
  8. My Carnet was never used. Do I still have to return it?
    Yes, all Carnets must be returned even if they were never used. Carnets that are not returned will be considered “open” and thus, the associated security deposit will remain in effect until the time during which a customs claim may be submitted to USCIB has ended.
  9. Are there restrictions on items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?
    As of October 30, 2017, rubies or jadeite of Burmese origin, whether mounted or unmounted, may now be imported into the United States. The previous prohibition was removed.  To locate the final rule, please visit Federal Register for the Treasury Department at: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-10-30/pdf/2017-23560.pdf.

Using a Foreign Carnet in the U.S.

  1. What if I don’t get my carnet stamped leaving the country?
    Please be advised that it is the carnet holder’s responsibility to have the carnet validated both in and out of the U.S. This means that if a U.S. Customs office has office hours before or after your flight, you must make arrangements to have the goods examined and carnet stamped. You can find the contact information for all ports of entry at: https://www.cbp.gov/contact/ports. If you fail to have your carnet validated for re-exportation and have your carnet stamped into a third country or upon re-importation before carnet expiration, you will be faced with a $50 regularization fee in the event of a claim issued later by U.S. Customs.If you fail to have your carnet validated for re-exportation and have any other form of foreign customs validation before carnet expiration (Landing Certificate, Certificate of Location, Waybill, Bill of Lading, etc.) you will be faced with a $100 regularization fee in the event of a claim issued later by U.S. Customs.
  2. My goods need to stay in the U.S. beyond Carnet expiration. What are my options?
    According to U.S. Customs regulations, foreign-issued Carnets may not be extended beyond expiration. Please note consumption entries are not allowed to discharge a Carnet entry. This may result in a second payment of duties on a claim made on the Carnet. However, to keep the merchandise in the U.S. beyond the expiration of the Carnet there are two options:

    1. File a T.I.B. (Temporary Importation under Bond / Temporary Import Bond) through a customs broker with U.S. Customs before the expiration of the Carnet. This will allow the merchandise to remain in the country for an additional year. The Carnet number must appear on the TIB paperwork and the merchandise description, weight, and value must be the same as those on the Carnet General List. The Carnet’s re-exportation voucher should be presented and validated by U.S. Customs referencing the TIB number and date. Copies of both bond and Carnet should be kept so that upon final re-exportation and re-importation into the country of issue, customs may clear the goods without unnecessary assessment of duties.
    2. Mitigation of duties may be afforded if the merchandise is re-exported after Carnet expiration:
      1. Re-exportation validated in the Carnet up to 90 days after Carnet expiration will result in the collection of 25% of the duty and 10% penalty within the case of a claim made on the Carnet, with a minimum of $50; or
      2. Re-exportation validated in the Carnet between 90 and 180 days after Carnet expiration will result in the collection of 50% of the duty and 10% penalty, with a minimum of $100.

      Goods re-exported 181 days after Carnet expiration are subject to the collection of the full amount of duty and 10% penalty.

  3. May I use a foreign Carnet to enter Puerto Rico, Guam or the U.S. Virgin Islands?
    Foreign carnets may be used for entry into Puerto Rico, but not for Guam or the U.S. Virgin islands (St. John, St. Croix, or St. Thomas)
  4. I would like to sell my goods imported into the U.S. on a foreign-issued Carnet. How should I proceed?
    If the Carnet has not yet expired, contact, either directly or through customs broker, the Entry Team at the Customs port of importation and request an anticipatory breach of the Carnet.Documents required to accompany the anticipatory breach are:

    1. A letter on the Carnet holder letterhead itemizing the goods that will not be re-exported and requesting to pay liquidated damages
    2. Copy of the front cover of the Carnet, the General List, and the Importation Counterfoil validated by U.S. Customs.

    Once a case number is issued by U.S. Customs and payment received, a receipt referencing the U.S. Customs Case number should be sufficient to discharge the items in the U.S.

    If the Carnet has already expired, contact the U.S. Customs Claim Examiner at USCIB Headquarters to see if a claim for duties has already been issued by U.S. Customs or to have a claim issued for the items not re-exported.

    Please note that effective February 2011, the port of JFK International Airport has ceased to accept anticipatory breaches of Carnets and will only accept such requests after Carnet expiration.

  5. Are there restrictions on items with jade and rubies from Myanmar?
    As of October 30, 2017, rubies or jadeite of Burmese origin, whether mounted or unmounted, may now be imported into the United States. The previous prohibition was removed. To locate the final rule, please visit Federal Register for the Treasury Department at: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-10-30/pdf/2017-23560.pdf.
  6. Can I bring a vehicle into the U.S. under a foreign-issued Carnet?
    If your Vehicle will be used as a sample (show/exhibit) or professional equipment (driven in a race/rally), you may import it into the U.S. temporarily under Carnet. If it will be driven on the roads, the vehicle will need to conform to DOT (Department of Transportation) and EPA (Environment Protection Agency) emissions standards prior to importation, unless it is a non-conforming vehicle: please see a licensed customs broker/forwarder for details. Please note also that U.S. Customs ports have their own policies regarding the acceptance of vehicles under Carnet.
  7. I am checking my Carnet goods with my baggage to leave the U.S. Where do I get my Carnet stamped?
    Present your Carnet and goods to U.S. Customs before checking in your baggage and boarding your flight, even if it connects at another U.S. city. U.S. Customs and Border Protection has recently ruled that Carnets should be stamped out of the U.S. (export or re-export) where the Carnet holder last had control of the goods and is not able to come into contact with them until they have arrived at the final foreign destination.For example, a Canadian company participates in a trade show in Las Vegas with goods under an ATA Carnet. When departing Las Vegas, the Carnet goods will connect through Los Angeles en route to the final destination of Vancouver. In this case, the Carnet holder should present his Carnet and goods at U.S. Customs in Las Vegas for re-export validation before checking in the luggage with the airlines through to Canada.The policy decision by U.S. Customs is based on CBP Directive 3280-013B and Muster Topic (#CCS-FY12-0031) dated 10/17/2011 in conjunction with the Office of Field Operations.
  8. Can I use a Carnet for an Exhibit at a Trade Show in the U.S.?
    While the U.S. did not sign onto the Exhibitions and Fairs Convention, it is common practice for goods to be shown at exhibits and industry fairs be imported to the United States under Carnet as “Commercial Samples” for goods to be exhibited or “Professional Equipment” for goods that will be used at the fair (booths, tables, etc.). Please visit the U.S. Customs and Border Protection website for more information:
    https://help.cbp.gov/s/article/Article-1212?language=en_US

General Information

  1. What do the acronyms ATA and TECRO/AIT represent?
    The initials ATA are an acronym of the French and English words Admission Temporaire/Temporary Admission. TECRO is the acronym for the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (TECRO) and AIT is for the American Institute in Taiwan. They represent the contracting parties to this agreement between the U.S. and Chinese Taipei.
  2. What is the origin of the ATA Carnet System?
    To encourage world trade by reducing the obstacles caused byvarying national customs regulations, the Customs Co-operation Council, now the World Customs Organization adopted in December, 1961, the “Customs Convention on the ATA Carnet for the Temporary Admission of Goods.” Carnets are issued and guaranteed by national groups, which administer the ATA Carnet System under a set of conditions established by the International Bureau of Chambers of Commerce (IBCC). The IBCC is sponsored by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) in Paris. Customs authorities in over 85 countries and territories accept the Carnet as a guarantee that all duties and taxes will be paid if the Carnet is misused.The U.S. Council for International Business has managed the ATA Carnet System in the United States since its appointment by the U.S. Customs Service in 1968. The U.S. issues over 17,000 Carnets per year, covering goods valued at over 2 billion dollars.
  3. How do I learn about Carnets around the world?
    Visit the website of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), www.iccwbo.org.
  4. How does the new Electronic Export Information filing requirement impact your ATA Carnet?
    Effective May 15, 2015 and as a result of changes to the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR), ATA Carnet is exempt from filng. These changes cover both U.S. and foreign ATA Carnets, as well as those coming from and going to Chinese Taipei (TECRO/AIT). For a complete guide to the new FTR export requirements click here.
  5. Where can I validate a  Carnet in the U.S.?
    Refer to our list of U.S. Airports for Validating a Carnet and the CBP Ports page to see where you can validate a Carnet in the U.S.

US-Issued ATA Carnets Now Allowed Into Brazil

After months of awareness building on the scope of the ATA Carnet usage with Brazilian Customs, Brazil has officially announced the acceptance of ATA Carnets. This exciting new development will allow all contracting parties to the ATA and/or the Istanbul Convention to enjoy ATA Carnet facilitations in Brazil. This change is also accompanied by an acceptance of hand-carried goods into the country.

Most explicitly, this new development will provide for duty and tax-free temporary admissions, allowing companies to use U.S. issued ATA Carnet to temporarily enter goods.

“Companies generally pay between 35-60 percent in duties exporting to Brazil, which will now be saved,” said Andy Shiles, USCIB’s senior vice president for ATA Carnet and trade services. “This program will be particularly advantageous for U.S. companies bringing in products temporarily for trade shows and exhibits.”  Prior to the amendment, U.S. companies, as per domestic regulation, could not use U.S. issued ATA Carnets as they were not accepted in Brazil.

The ATA Carnet is the global gold standard for temporary admissions under the auspices of the World Customs Organization. ATA Carnets are international tools of trade facilitation, which serve as a temporary export-import documentation. The ATA System is in place in 87 countries and territories, and provides duty-free and tax-free imports on goods that will be re-exported within 12 months.

In calendar year 2017, there were over $6 billion worth of goods that moved under U.S. issued Carnets that helped to stimulate international trade for American businesses.

For more information, please visit our page dedicated to Brazil.

 

USCIB is the U.S. National Guaranteeing Association

Origin of the ATA Carnet System

In 1961, The ATA Carnet Convention on temporary imports was adopted by the World Customs Organization to encourage world trade by reducing the barriers caused by varying national customs regulations. USCIB was appointed by the Treasury Department in 1969 to operate and manage the ATA Carnet system in the United States.

U.S. National Guaranteeing Association

USCIB is the national guaranteeing association of ATA Carnets under a set of conditions established by the World Chambers Federation, a division of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) in Paris. ATA Carnets allow temporary, duty-free imports overseas for goods generally qualified for use in trade shows or as commercial samples and professional equipment.

Claims Administration: Causes of a Claim

Causes  |  Settlement  |  Charges  |  Contact

What Causes a Claim?

Claims are caused by improper handling of Carnet merchandise.  Here are some examples which may result in a claim:

  • Goods are sold and will remain in the importing country permanently;
  • Goods are stolen or lost;
  • Goods are not re-exported in a timely manner:
  • Re-exported after the expiration of a Carnet from an importing country; or
  • Re-exported after a designated date of re-exportation set by a foreign customs inspector at the time of importation.
  • Indirect proof of re-exportation may cause a claim for countries such as Austria, Singapore, Switzerland, and UAE

Customs authorities have a right to limit the duration of a Carnet to less than the Carnet validity.  When such a restriction is noted on the importation counterfoil of the Carnet, the Holder must ensure that the goods are re-exported on or before that date. The Holder may petition foreign customs for an extension of this date. However, permission must be obtained prior to the designated date of re-exportation. It has been our experience that India, Mexico, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand typically restrict importations on Carnets.

  • Clerical errors made by Carnet Holders or their authorized representatives or customs inspectors, e.g., the handling of split or partial shipments under Carnets.

When Will a Claim be Issued?

A foreign customs authority must issue a claim within twelve months after the Carnet expiration. Working in conjunction with USCIB, Holders have six months from the date of the customs claim notification, within which to provide evidence of re-exportation out of the country issuing the claim. Once a claim is received, the Carnet will not be cancelled and the security against the Carnet will be held until all claims are resolved.

How Will I be Notified?

Upon receipt of a claim from foreign customs, USCIB will verify its validity and will attempt to settle the claim based on the documentation within the Carnet itself.  However, if the necessary evidence is not available, USCIB will send a claim notification letter to the Holder at the address in our file. It is important for Carnet Holders to notify their Service Provider of any changes in address and/or contact people.

Please note that there is a time limit to present evidence to foreign customs. The Holder is expected to assist USCIB’s Claims Examiners in settling the claim by responding promptly to our notifications. The Holder should:

  • Submit all documentary proof to USCIB immediately; or
  • Send written authorization, including Carnet number, to pay the taxes, duties and penalties as assessed by the foreign customs if the merchandise will remain in the importing country permanently; or
  • Contact a Foreign Claims Examiner for further assistance.

Claims Administration: Claims Settlement

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There are two types of Carnet proof that may resolve a Claim:

Carnet Proof

A Re-exportation Counterfoil validated by a customs inspector of the country issuing the claim. The date of customs validation on the counterfoil must be after the date of importation on the claim and before the expiry date of the Carnet.
For the European Union (EU), the Re-exportation Counterfoil may be validated by a custom inspector from any EU country.
If foreign customs accept this type of evidence in settling the claim, payment of taxes and duties is usually not necessary.

  1. A Re-importation or Exportation Voucher/Counterfoil validated by a U.S. Customs inspector which documents the same goods that were imported into the country issuing the claim. The date of the customs validation must be after the date of importation on the claim and before the expiry date of the Carnet;
  2. An Importation or Re-exportation Counterfoil validated by a foreign customs inspector which documents the same goods that were imported into the country issuing the claim. The date of the customs validation must be after the date of importation on the claim and before the expiry date of the Carnet.

Some foreign customs authorities may impose a “Regularization Fee” for accepting this type of proof.For further assistance, please contact a Foreign Claims Examiner.

Non-Carnet Proof

Non-Carnet proof includes customs-validated documents dated after the date of importation on the claim. USCIB does not guarantee the acceptance of non-Carnet proof by foreign customs.Please ensure that the Carnet number and other Carnet-specific information are indicated on any of the following documents: e.g., description of merchandise as listed on the General List, the value and the total weight of the goods.

Certificate of Disposition Validated by U.S. Customs Service (Form CF3227)

A Certificate of Disposition is used to provide evidence to foreign customs that the goods in question have been re-imported into the U.S. The Holder should present the merchandise to the U.S. Customs office, upon or after re-importation, for inspection and obtain proper certification using the Certificate of Disposition form. Contact the Entry Branch of the U.S. Customs office for details and to schedule an appointment. Click here to download the form, instructions, and a sample.

Foreign Customs Cashier’s Receipt

In the case of a sale of merchandise (either in part or in whole), the USCIB recommends that Holders secure a foreign customs cashier’s receipt before departure from the importing country. This receipt will be used to prove payment of applicable duties and taxes upon receipt of a claim. The cashier’s receipt should indicate the Carnet number and items numbers on the General List for which payment is being made. At the time the receipt is obtained, Holders should also request the customs authorities to make the appropriate notations on the re-exportation voucher. Upon return to the U.S., Holders should send a copy of the receipt to USCIB, Foreign Claims Division, 1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036.

Customs Entry Forms Used at the Time of Re-importation into the US,

  1. Entry/Immediate Delivery (Form CF3461)
  2. Carrier Certificate
  3. Entry Summary (Form CF 7511)

Claims Administration: What Charges Might I Face?

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What Charges Might I Face?

Duties, Taxes and Penalties; Regularization Fees

A Carnet allows the temporary importation of merchandise without the deposit of taxes (e.g., value-added taxes, VAT) and duties or the purchase of an import bond.  With a customs claim for which there is no proof of re-exportation, duties, taxes and usually a penalty (10% of the duty and taxes) will become payable.

This VAT chart is a general reference guide. Actual taxes and duties may vary.

Regularization Fees and Penalties

Foreign customs may charge a Regularization Fee if the re-exportation counterfoil was not validated by a customs inspector upon re-exportation or if proof of re-exportation is submitted more than 6 months after the customs claims date (for the Netherlands ONLY).  The amount of this fee and its application vary from country to country.

Countries known to impose a Regularization Fee are:

Austria104.00 Euros
Netherlands140 Euros
Serbia9450.00 RSD (Serbian Dinars)
As of July 1,2023
Switzerland50 - 250 CHF (Swiss Francs)
Thailand10% of import duties
No<1000 Baht & No>20,000 Baht
Turkey318 TRY (Turkish Lira)

 

Countries known to impose Penalties are:

MalaysiaCompound Charges RMI 1.00 - 5,000.00
Mexico2,070 - 3,120(MXN)
Singapore30 - 5,000 (SGD) and GST/duties where applicable
UAE500 - 5,000 (AED)
Ukraine850 - 17,000 (UAH)

 

USCIB Claims Handling Fees

Effective October 21, 2014:

Claim Payment to Foreign Customs

Claims Handling Fee
(minimum)

$1 to $150$50
$151 to $1,000$100
$1,001 to $2,500$200
$2,501 to $5,000$300
$5,001 to $7,500$400
$7,501 to $10,000$500
Over $10,0005% of the amount paid;
Maximum of $4,000

 

USCIB reserves the right to assess any charges on any claims that require excessive claim Examiners’ time; telephone, facsimile or postage charges; and other situations that cause financial or other loss to USCIB as a result of misuse of an ATA Carnet.

Carnet Countries

At present, over 75 countries accept Carnets.  New members are added periodically.  Each country designates a National Guaranteeing Association (NGA), which oversees the operation of the Carnet system in that country.  The World Chambers Federation (WCF), a division of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), in Paris, with the World Customs Organization (WCO) in Brussels, administer the Carnet System worldwide.

·  Member Countries

·  Non-member Areas

Know Before You Go

Departing the US | Entering a Country | Departing a Country | Re-Entering the US
Transiting a Country | Upon Return | Know Before You Go | Glossary

 

Read this before preparing your application

Air Couriers

While DHL accepts Carnet shipments, FedEx and UPS (small package divisions) generally do not.

Commercial Value

U.K. customs denied entry of Carnet because the merchandise was undervalued and did not represent a “reasonable commercial value.” Using the insured value of goods on your General List will usually result in a “reasonable commercial value”.

Export/Import Requirements

Obtaining a Carnet does not release your obligation to comply with U.S. Government export controls or foreign country import controls.  Some articles may require an export license for reasons of national security and foreign policy.  An export license allows U.S. companies to export commodities that are controlled by U.S. regulations.  Check with foreign customs in advance for their restriction or requirements on goods entering their country.

Electronic Export Information Filing

Effective May 15, 2015 and as a result of changes to the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR), ATA Carnet is exempt from filng. These changes cover both U.S. and foreign ATA Carnets, as well as those coming from and going to Chinese Taipei (TECRO/AIT). For a complete guide to the new FTR export requirements click here.

10+2 Importer Security Filing

ATA Carnets are not exempt from importer security filing (ISF, otherwise known as 10+2). However, ATA Carnet shipments ARE exempt from posting the bond required of other shipments entering or re-entering the U.S. via vessel. Except for the provision of the six digit HTSUS codes, the information needed to complete the ISF can be found on the Carnet or available from the broker clearing the entry.

Jewelry

It is highly recommended that identifying photographs be appended to the General List for Carnets entering European Union, especially Italy and the United Kingdom. It is also recommended that identifying photographs be appended to the General List for all types of Jewelry entries into Israel.

Holders should have blue transit certificates in their Carnet when bringing jewelry samples and/or loose precious stones to France. It is also recommended that Carnets covering jewelry and entering Switzerland for an exhibition or fair include transit sheets.

Motor Vehicles

Motor vehicles may travel on ATA Carnets only if the vehicles are commercial samples, professional equipment (e.g. for races) or to be displayed at an exhibition or fair. Special security deposit rules apply. Vehicles crossing the US Canada border as means of transportation are exempt from ATA Carnet requirements.

Personal use road vehicles (autos, motorcycles, trailers, ATVs, RVs, caravans) for touring, vacation and non-business travel need to obtain a CPD (Carnet de Passages en Douanes). To obtain a CPD, contact Monika Jadeszko at +1 847.852.3100 or Info@CPDCarnet.com, boomerang carnets for assistance. Boomerang carnets is authorized by the FIA to issue CPDs to American and Canadian residents for touring purposes.

Horses

Effective April 1, 2017 all ATA Carnet Preparers that have a horse listed on their general list will be required to complete and submit an ATA Carnet Horse Questionnaire (click to download form) along with any related supporting documentation before the ATA Carnet can be issued. USCIB recommends Preparers use the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) database https://data.fei.org/Default.aspx as a tool to assist validation of the value of the horses in addition to the questionnaire. USCIB no longer requires that the minimum value of horse listed on the general list of the ATA Carnet be $10,000. The actual value of the horse must be listed on the general list of the Carnet.

Read this before hand-carrying or shipping your goods overseas under Carnets

Airports

To avoid a claim, have the counterfoils and vouchers validated upon entry and exit into a foreign country.  Make doubly sure that the yellow re-import voucher is stamped by US customs.  This is your last line of defense to settle a claim.

For Carnets with a valid claim, Holders are subject to a maximum penalty of 10% of the total duties and taxes levied by a foreign customs authority.  This penalty is in addition to the duties and taxes.  Holders will also be charged a USCIB Claims Handling Fee.

Carnet Shipments Held-Up at Customs

Regular business hours, contact USCIB, Carnet HQ, immediately for assistance; tel: 800-538-8937, fax: (212) 944-0012, email: atacarnet@uscib.org.

Carnet Green Cover

Upon initial departure, the Holder or authorized representative must sign the green cover. U.S. Customs must validate the green cover and a yellow exportation counterfoil to activate the Carnet for its first use.  Foreign customs may deny entry of goods under a Carnet if neither the green cover nor the exportation counterfoil is properly validated.

Restricted Carnets

A foreign customs authority has the right to restrict the duration of a Carnet shipment and require that the goods leave prior to the expiration date of the Carnet.  If a customs authority limits your stay, this will be noted on the importation counterfoil (Item 2—Final Date of Re-Exportation) at the time of entry.

Substituting Goods

U.S. Customs levied an $80,000 penalty on a U.S. Carnet Holder who knowingly substituted similar goods on General Lists for re-importation into the U.S.

 

Carnet Usage: Departing the U.S.

Departing the US | Entering a Country | Departing a Country | Re-Entering the US
Transiting a Country | Upon Return | Know Before You Go | Glossary

 

  1. For initial departure, the Holder or authorized representative must first sign the green cover. U.S. Customs must validate the green cover and a yellow exportation counterfoil to activate the Carnet for its first use. For U.S. issued Carnets there are no exportation vouchers. Foreign customs may deny entry of goods under a Carnet if neither the green cover nor the exportation counterfoil is validated by U.S. Customs.
  2. Use a yellow exportation counterfoil (for initial departure, use No.1). Indicate only those item numbers that are leaving the U.S. in Section (1) of the counterfoil. It is the Holder’s responsibility to ensure that U.S. Customs has indicated the correct item numbers on the counterfoil especially in a partial or split shipment.
  3. Present the Carnet to U.S. Customs.
  4. U.S. Customs will then validate the counterfoil.